CURRENT RESEARCH:

Recovery of Sleep and Neurobehavioral Function after Sleep Loss

Sleep loss is associated with significant health risks and financial cost. While there has been considerable effort directed toward understanding the manner in which fatigue accumulates, remarkably few studies have examined systematically the recovery of sleep and neurobehavioral function in response to sleep loss. This study evaluates the neurobehavioral effects of one night of sleep loss, then assesses the dynamics of varying duration (3, 6 and 9 hours) of recovery sleep in terms of neurobehavioral performance, mood, and sleep quality and composition.

This study is a joint project in collaboration with The Centre for Sleep Research - University of South Australia (www.unisa.edu.au/sleep/)

Following an in-person screening interview, eligible participants are scheduled to spend 12 consecutive days and nights in the laboratory. Polysomnographic sleep and wakefulness are recorded continuously (using electrodes placed on the face and scalp). A computerized set of performance tasks is completed every 3 hours during wakefulness. After an adpatation and two baseline nights of regular sleep, subjects remain awake for up to 45 hours. Then, for the next 7 nights, subjects sleep for their assigned duration (3, 6, or 9 hours).

Individuals interested in participating in this study should contact our study recruiter, Ms. Melanie Roberts, R.N., at (914) 997-5825 for information and initial eligibility screening.

WCMC IRB protocol #: 0708009374

An Interdisciplinary Study of Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder

The purpose of this study is to learn more about physiological characteristics and genetic bases of circadian rhythm sleep disorders, particularly Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder. Circadian rhythm sleep disorders are caused by a misalignment between the timing of the internal body clock, which regulates sleep timing, and the 24-hour social and physical environments. Research participants live in a time-free environment for two weeks, during which sleep, wakefulness, and body temperature are recorded continuously, and other circadian measures are obtained periodically. A skin sample is collected at the start of the study and is analyzed for molecular timing and ultimately comparison to the results from the physiological and behavioral components.

This study is a joint project in collaboration with The Laboratory of Genetics - Rockefeller University (www.rockefeller.edu/labheads/young/young-lab.php)

Individuals interested in participating in this study should contact our study recruiter, Ms. Melanie Roberts, R.N., at (914) 997-5825 for information and initial eligibility screening.

WCMC IRB protocol #: 0609008750

Sleep, Activity Patterns and Temperature in Childhood Onset Bipolar Disorder.

This study is being conducted to learn more about some of the symptoms of bipolar disorder in children. Many parents have reported that their children with bipolar disorder have certain sleep difficulties, are hyperactive or less active at certain times throughout the day, and feel hotter or colder than others at certain times of day.

The specific aims of the study are to characterize sleep, activity patterns, and skin temperature in children with and without a diagnosis of bipolar disorder to learn more about these symptoms. Participants between the ages of 5 and 12 are studied at home over the course of two weeks, and parents/guardians assist in the collection of data.

This study is a joint project in collaboration with the Juvenile Bipolar Research Foundation.

Parents/guardians of children ages 5-12 who are interested in participating in this study with their children should visit the following website: www.jbrf.org. On the left side of the website is a link to "Research Studies". Initial eligibility for the study is determined after a parent/guardian completes the Child Bipolar Questionnaire, available at the Research Studies link on the JBRF website. Additional information about this and other JBRF-related studies are available at the website as well.

WCMC IRB protocol #: 0806009872

SUPPORT:

In addition to support from Weill Cornell Medical College, and the Department of Psychiatry, almost all of the research studies conducted by the Laboratory of Human Chronobiology are funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) through investigator-initiated research grants.

Our current projects are funded by the following grants:

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke R01 NS057628 Recovery of Sleep and Neurobehavioral Function after Sleep Loss P.I.: Campbell

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke R01 NS052495 An Interdisciplinary Study of Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder P.I.: Campbell

National Institute of Mental Health R21 MH080269 Sleep, Activity Patterns and Temperature in Childhood Onset Bipolar Disorder P.I.: Murphy

Publicly available information about these NIH grants can be obtained via the CRISP (Computer Retrieval of Information of Scientific Project) database at:

http://crisp.cit.nih.gov/

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